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here. jobs are critically important, and i think if you take a look at what is wrong with washington, d.c. compan, there a long list of people. the jobs bill as a prime example that you brought up. it is interesting the gentleman i am running with is hyper partisan. he mentioned rosa, and she has gotten off hold of me and said he has not been much of the health on the subcommittee, and quite frankly, what needs to be done is people need to work together as americans. is when doesion thi politics trump jobs? is it when clean air or clean water is at stake or perhaps politics? >> the answer is jobs, and we need to create an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion in
their voices. they will play a very important role. it you are not going to be able to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable rol
will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threatens our children's future, our majority passed a budget that begins to solve the problems. now, while others chose inaction in the face of this threat, we offered solutions. and the american people want solutions. and tonight, they have responded by renewing our house republican majority. >> the republicans will now have 221 seats, the 164 for the democrats. one wonders whether the leader the democratic part
to the washington area arriving outside of washington. thursday on washington journal with both chambers returning to washington next week, we will speak with our guest about what lies ahead and scott wilson. washington journal is life every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. analysts and the former director participated in a bipartisan panel examining the next steps for the president and congress hosted by laszlo strategies. this is over an hour. >> who loo>> good morning. welcome. i am founder and president of this organization which is laszlo strategies. it does strategic communication but we're not partisan and i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panels to offer the audience today. we have to audiences, a live audience here, we are in the rayburn office building in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank congressman berman for his service. it is an incredible thing to have to serve or be willing to serve. it is a painful process to go through negative campaigning. i think the american voters odette of gratitude to all who are willing to serve whe
. that's the attitude in washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, part of what you have to ask yourself is, who do you trust? when you are talking about the economy and policy that is so critical to our future, you've got to ask yourself, who do you trust? you may not agree with every decision i have made -- michele does not agree with every decision i have made. there may be times when you are frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say and i say what i mean. you know what i believe, you know where i stand, what i said we would end the war in iraq, we ended it. what i said we would pass health care reform, we passed it. when i said we would repeal do not ask do not tell, we repeal that. you know i tell the truth. and most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you, i know what will change looks like because i f
in washington and making history at the same time. that story next. ♪ ♪ ♪ mom? dad? guys? [ engine turns over ] [ engine revs ] ♪ he'll be fine. [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. take advantage of exceptional values during the season of audi event. to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ bikes and balloons, and noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. a wand, some wings, soup with good things. sidewalks and doodles and wholesome noodles. puddles and pails and yes, puppy dog tails. for a lunch like this, there's a hug and a kiss. because that's what happy kids are made of. campbell'
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
against human desire. back cannot work. i am a student at george washington university. there is a large push from the and the price of a community about legalization of marijuana. -- from the undergraduate timidity about legislation and marijuana. could this lead to a nationwide reform movement? >> it is different. i presume the undergraduate movement at gwi is people who want to get something. temperance movement was to deny somebody else opportunity to get something. the women's movement that was the firast mass move apart -- movement for prohibition was very noble. women were victimized by prohibition in horrible ways. women have no voting rights, the bourse was a rarity. -- women had no voting rights, divorce was a rarity. it was an effort to free the family, free women from this. it is hard to get my arms around comparison between that and an undergraduate desire for marijuana. >> most major changes in the country, from popular movements, some of them start on college campuses, some in other places. >> there is a meaningful parallel. it is generational. the same generation that is
on whether she even has the temperament to be secretary of state. that's a big question in washington, d.c. let me say it again. does susan rice have the temperament to be secretary of state? there are a lot of people, democrats who will tell you privately that just maybe she doesn't. but we're not talking about this. this is a clown show that's going on right now. what is -- >> i love that debate. >> well, the long game is unclear and the short game is even more unclear because they're not going to hold up the nomination of susan rice. i meaning if you look at the big picture. they only need to peel off -- i don't know what the number is five or six republican senators. >> who do they end up making stronger? >> they make the obama white house or susan rice look stronger but fighting the fight, three, four, five of them on a losing cause and won't hold up the nomination with four senators. >> it would appear that prior to yesterday that this was all a political passing storm that would get through this and speak behind closed doors and get through this or she would get through this but m
of acceptable discussion. it's only in official in washington that this has not been, you know, accepted, and, by the way, i hate to pick the liberals down one more time, but i have never, in my life, heard legalization of drugs talk about in a presidential debate until the first republican primary debit, end of last year or this year, and they got a big round of applause. they did not get through it off the stage. they got laughed at by mitt romney and the rest of them, but you take out the little, what we call in marxist theory, the super structure of the party apparatus, and everybody takes it seriously. maybe the guys will contradict me. >> i prefer taxes on consumption opposed to an investment or anything that creates additional income. i'm not a fan of the drug war so i don't object to it. i'm skeptical of marijuana legalization as a grand deficit reduction strategy. i have to see numbers suggesting it would bring in the types of revenue that we're really talking about, and politically, it will be a very difficult thing to do so i'm not sure -- i'm in favor of it, but i'm not sure it's
's a lot of talk in washington susan rice is undermined politically. it might hurt her in washington, but, wolf, you've covered world capitals. think about the world. if the president were to fight for her, again that's an if, people would say she's obviously his person, he's loyal to her. even someone like colin powell, people always wondered, am i talking to george w. bush or colin powell? will he be undermined by donald rumsfeld or dick cheney? if she wins, her stature might go up around the world. >> even if she were to be confirmed with let's say 60 votes, five republicans would jump and endorse her, the secretary of state supposed to represent everyone be a bipartisan leader if you will. it could be a little awkward though. >> it is awkward. you're going into a second term. you want to build your legacy. the republicans are going to have to work with the president on tough other issues, taxes and spending issues. will republicans give him tax increases through reform or higher rates? what about immigration reform? again, what about these other personnel choices? there will be policy
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
from the outside in washington. simultaneously, there's something else under way this morning within the republican party saying we have to change. we cannot go on like this because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past and looked at that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription for what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed, and the obama people were running a pote modern campaign with technology and looking at the diverse electorate we now have. >> some people say republican soul searching, other republicans say it will be civil war. >> no question. paul ryan is a leader of this party. is it that they were not conservative enough? the reality is mitt romney won a near historic portion of the white vote in america, and he suffered a very bad loss. that's because the country looks different. it has changed. the party has got to find a way to reach out to latinos, the fastest growing voting bloc to become a more diverse party with th
, thank you for coming in. roll call house editor. that is it for "washington journal." nancy pelosi is giving a press conference in a few moments on c-span 2. we will now join the house which is in session. day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11: 50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois, mr. quigley, for five minutes. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, an estimated 50,000 people die every year as a result of seize years. some of -- seizures. some of these victims are like danny stanton. chicago's mike and mary stanton founded the danny foundation after their 4-year-old son, danny
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
. the territory covers 138 square miles. it's about twice the size of washington d.c. about 1.7 million people live in gaza. most are palestinian refugees in densely populated wrarz. israel covers 7,850 square miles, which is about the size of emergency new jersey. more than 7.5 million people live there. they are surrounded by the north, by lebanon, and syria. jordan to the east and south of the west bank, which is palestinian territory. it's all the east of israel, and on the southwestern side is egypt where the new muslim brotherhood government supports the palestinians. israel has to keep its eye on all sides in what is considered a hostile region. cnn is right in the middle of the crisis. just hours ago our own fred plankton issued the shelling on the border between israel and gaza and got to see a reaction from israel live. he was speaking with carol costello when this happened just an hour ago. take a look. >> there's an interceptor missile taking place there. if you just saw the flash in the school, that was a rocket coming out of gaza that was just intercepted right now. it appears as
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
, it is pressure from the outside of washington. simultaneously, there is something else under way this morning within the republican party saying that we have to change. we cannot go on like this, because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past who lookedt that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription to what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed and the obama were running a post-modern campaign with technology and the diverse electorate. >> some republicans say a soul searching and other republicans say civil war, david. >> no question that paul ryan is a leader of the party. were they not conservative enough? the fact is that mitt romney won a historic portion of the white vote in america and suffered a bad loss, because the country has changed and looks different. they have to become a more diverse party with the ability to shed some of the orthodoxy around taxes, around spending, over the role of government. and this process is going to beg
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
was right when he said he can't change washington from the inside. you can take him at his word. that's why we're going to send him outside. all right? when i'm elected i'm going to work with republicans and democrats in congress. i'm going to meet regularly with their leaders. i'm going to endeavor to find those good men and women on both sides of the aisle who care more about the country than they do about politics. and together, we're going to put the nation back on track to a balanced budget and to reform our tax code and to finally reaffirm our commitment to financial responsibility. now, if the president were to be re-elected he would continue his war on coal and oil and natural gas. he would send billions more to his favorite friends and all of this means higher gasoline prices and fewer jobs. today gasoline costs twice what it did when president obama took office. and when i'm elected, we're going to change the course of energy entirely. i know just how much energy means to middle class families in this country. we can help hold down prices in the pump and grow new energy jobs and n
them. drastic situations. so as we do our work here in washington, we need to make certain that on this house floor there is advocacy for the response to these given situations. you know, already the price tags coming forth from the leadership back home. governo cuomo, for instance, suggesting the price is now -- the impact is now steadily risen, and, you know, at first snapshot you can't begin to comprehend all the damage and all the aspects and dynamics of recovery that would be required. now we're looking at something $30 billion that impacts a state in a very severe way. disrupts service. electric power that's disrupted. commerce that's frozen in place. human misery that's incalculable. where lives have been impacted forever by the forces of sandy. you know, this is a revisitation, so to spook, as we're -- speak, as we're still recovering. there was a fight on this floor that disaster aid moneys were brought into place so that we could respond with compassion and with dignity and integrity to these given situations. so the lessons here are to go forth as we deal with th
of washington, d.c. and even in florida outside of tampa, they're seeing big turnout numbers there, too. they don't think he can get his 2008 turnout numbers but, scott, as you know tonight, it's going to be all about turnout. >> pelley: yes, it will, jan, thank you very much. the candidate who gets his voters to the polls is likely to win today. norah, turnout is everything and the electorate's been changing since 2008. >> it has. that's one of the things i'm going to be looking at tonight. not only how big is the turnout but the size of the electorate. the different democrat graphic groups. we saw as i pointed out during our evening news that 26% of the electorate in 2008 was a minority electorate. does that grow? does it stay the same or shrink? that will be part of it. the white vote which was about 73% of the vote where will that be tonight? it will speak to not only the changing nature of the country's electorate but also give us clues about which candidate is doing better. >> pelley: bob, the national polls over the last few days, dead heat. dead even for both candidates. it's re
on the ballot in the november election. the system is p currently used in louisiana, washington state, and california. it is now a ballot member prop 21. what is your position on the top two primary system and why? >> we'll start with jill stein. >> thank you. and thank you so much to free & equal, and thank you for being here. i think top two does not enlarge our democracy. in many ways, it confuses things more. it puts many candidates onto the ballot all together, and it arbitrarily attaches party labels to them. any candidate can choose any label they want. so it really degrades the meaning of our political parties, where they have meaning, and i know they don't always, but there are some that do have meaning that aren't bought and sold to the highest bidder, and the green party is one of those parties. and i know there are some other parties here as well, the independent parties, where the parties actually represent real values. and the top two obscures the meaning of those parties, and it puts everyone together, so you really can't tell who is representing you, and whoever hats
with washington and what could make it work better. we're back in democracy plaza and some of the stranger ways to predict who will win on tuesday. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >>> a now a different way to predict the winner of the presidential race. you may heard of the red skins rule. when they win their last home game prior to a presidential election, that election is won by the party that won the popular vote in the previous election. when they lose the last home game, it is won by the party that lost the popular vote in the previous election. this rule is 18 for 18. it had an addendum to it because the one year it could have been wrong when they lost but president bush won re-election. but the popular vote. in 2008, the phillys won the world series, obama carried pennsylvania and he went on to win the election. in '96 the yankees won, clinton carried new york. tigers won, reagan carried mitch, you get the picture? we could keep going. you get to go all the way back to herbert hoover. the world series champs this year come from california. and one of the newest predictors is in college foot
around washington. on the other hand, the big strength for governor romney is down in coal country, down in southeastern virginia. then governor romney probably has a better chance around norfolk because of those defense issues down there that you just heard john dickerson talk about. so when we get a better feel as to where most of this vote is turning how the, we'll have a better feel as to whose actually ahead. >> pelley: nora, this gives canada them alot of confidence. >> virginia is key. they feel good about virginia because of that heavy turnout. those exit polls we talked about 52% of the electorate is female. it was actually 54% in 2008. these numbers can change a little bit but suggest the female vote is down a little bit. and one of the toughest fights we saw over women voters was actually in virginia. the after that debate where there was that discussion about binders full of women, romney immediately went on the air in virginia with an ad saying that he is for contraception and then obama came back with another ad contradicting that sniesmght thank yo.>> pelley: thank you .
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
also believe, by the way, there are some things washington should not do, for example, we don't need a bunch of politicians trying to control health care decisions that women are perfectly capable of making themselves. [ cheers and applause ] for four years, we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and it's interesting, when he first came into office, his economic plan asked the wealthier americans to play a little more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, the republican congress and a certain senate candidate by the name of mitt romney -- [ crowd booing ] don't boo, vote. vote. you don't need to boo. folks can't hear you boo, but they can hear you vote. anyway, this candidate, mr. romney, along with the republican congress, they all said, bill clinton's playing us terrible. it will hurt the economy. it's going to kill jobs. turns out, their math was just as bad then as it is now because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america has created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up, poverty
of those issues and all of them talk about what's wrong with washington and what could make it work better. we're back in democracy plaza with our saturday panel and some of the stranger ways to predict who will win on tuesday. you're watching a special primetime edition of "the daily rundown." we'll be right back. ♪ if you are one of the millions of men who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men w
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